Health-Diet.us



RENAL DIET for Chronic Kidney Disease

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Food NameCarbProteinFatPhosphorusPotassiumWater 
Milk, human6.91.04.4145188
Milk4.73.32.09414889
Milk, cow's, fluid, whole4.53.23.39114388
Milk, cow's, fluid, whole, low-sodium4.53.13.58625388
Milk, calcium fortified, cow's, fluid, whole4.53.23.29114388
Milk, calcium fortified, cow's, fluid, 1% fat5.03.41.09515090
Milk, calcium fortified, cow's, fluid, skim or nonfat4.93.40.210116691
Milk, cow's, fluid, other than whole ("lowfat")4.83.31.39615290
Milk, cow's, fluid, 2% fat4.73.32.09415089
Milk, cow's, fluid, acidophilus, 1% fat5.03.41.09515090
Milk, cow's, fluid, acidophilus, 2% fat4.73.32.09415089
Milk, cow's, fluid, 1% fat5.03.41.09515090
Milk, cow's, fluid, skim or nonfat, 0.5% or less butterfat5.03.40.110115691
Milk, cow's, fluid, filled with vegetable oil4.73.33.49713988
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Usage Note

  • Carbohydrate, protein, fat and water values are in grams and calculated per 100 g of food weight.
  • Phosphorus and potassium contents are in milligrams per 100 g of food weight.
  • Click on column header to sort foods by name or by nutrient content.
  • Pie chart shows relative contributions to total calories from carbohydrate, protein and fat (and alcohol, if exists).
  • The mineral and vitamin charts show the relative contents of minerals and vitamins of each food. The higher the bubble, the higher mineral or vitamin content a food has relative to other foods. The larger the bubble, the greater the mineral or vitamin content relative to the Recommended Daily Allowances.

RENAL DIET for Chronic Kidney Disease

information from the National Institutes of Health

When you have chronic kidney disease, you need to make changes in your diet, including:

  • Limiting fluids
  • Eating a low-protein diet (this may be recommended)
  • Restricting salt, potassium, phosphorus, and other electrolytes
  • Getting enough calories if you are losing weight

Your recommended diet may change over time if your kidney disease gets worse, or if you need dialysis.

Purpose of the RENAL DIET

information from the National Institutes of Health

The purpose of this diet is to maintain a balance of electrolytes, minerals, and fluid in patients who are on dialysis. The special diet is important because dialysis alone does not effectively remove ALL waste products. These waste products can also build up between dialysis treatments.

Most dialysis patients urinate very little or not at all. Therefore, fluid restriction between treatments is very important. Without urination, fluid will build up in the body and lead to excess fluid in the heart, lungs, and ankles.


RENAL DIET Recommendations

from the National Institutes of Health

CARBOHYDRATES
If you are overweight or have diabetes, you may need to limit the amount of carbohydrates you eat. Otherwise, carbohydrates are a good source of energy for your body. If your health care provider has recommended a low-protein diet, you may replace the calories from protein with:
•Fruits, breads, grains, and vegetables. These foods provide energy, as well as fiber, minerals, and vitamins.
•Hard candies, sugar, honey, and jelly.
If needed, you can even eat high-calorie desserts such as pies, cakes, or cookies, as long as you limit desserts made with dairy, chocolate, nuts, or bananas.

Online database: Carbohydrate Content of Foods

FATS
Fats can be a good source of calories. Make sure to use monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (olive oil, canola oil, safflower oil) to help protect your arteries. Talk to your doctor, nurse, or dietitian about fats and cholesterol that may increase your risk for heart problems.

PROTEIN
Low-protein diets may be helpful before dialysis. Your doctor or dietitian may recommend a moderate-protein diet (1 gram of protein per kilogram of body weight per day).

Once you start dialysis, you will need more protein. In fact, a high-protein diet with fish, poultry, pork, or eggs at every meal may be recommended. This will help you replace muscles and other tissues that you lose.

People on dialysis should eat 8 - 10 ounces of high-protein foods each day. Your doctor, dietitian, or nurse may suggest adding egg whites, egg white powder, or protein powder.

Online database: Protein Content of Foods

CALCIUM and PHOSPHORUS
Calcium and phosphorus, two other important minerals in the body, are also monitored closely. Even in the early stages of chronic kidney disease, phosphorus levels in the blood can become too high. This can cause:

•Low calcium (this causes the body to pull calcium from your bones, which can make your bones weaker and more likely to break)

•Itching

You will need to limit the amount of dairy foods that you eat. This includes milk, yogurt, and cheese. Some dairy foods are lower in phosphorus, including tub margarine, butter, cream cheese, heavy cream, ricotta cheese, brie cheese, sherbet, and nondairy whipped toppings.

Fruits and vegetables contain only small amounts of phosphorus.

You may need to take calcium supplements to prevent bone disease, and vitamin D to control the balance of calcium and phosphorus in your body. Ask your doctor, nurse, or dietititan.

If dietary measures to lower phosphorus are not enough, your doctor may recommend "phosphorus binders."

Online database: Calcium Content of Foods

Online database: Phosphorus Content of Foods

FLUIDS
In the early stages of chronic kidney disease, you do not need to limit how much fluid you drink. As your kidney disease becomes worse or when you are on dialysis, you will need to watch how much you drink. In between dialysis sessions, fluid can build up in the body.

Your doctor and dialysis nurse will let you know how much you should drink every day. Do not eat too much of foods that contain a lot of water, such as soups, Jell-O, popsicles, ice cream, grapes, melons, lettuce, tomatoes, and celery.

Use smaller cups or glasses and turn over your cup after you have finished it.

Tips to keep from becoming thirsty include:

•Avoid salty foods

•Freeze some juice in an ice cube tray and eat it like a popsicle (you must count these ice cubes in your daily amount of fluids)

•Stay cool on hot days

SALT or SODIUM
Reducing sodium in your diet helps you control high blood pressure, keeps you from being thirsty, and prevents your body from holding onto extra fluid. A low-salt diet is usually needed.

Look for these words on food labels:

•Low-sodium

•No salt added

•Sodium-free

•Sodium reduced

•Unsalted

Check all labels to see how much salt or sodium foods contain per serving. Also, avoid foods that list salt near the beginning of the ingredients. Look for products with less than 100 mg of salt per serving.

Do not use salt when cooking and take the salt shaker away from the table. Most other herbs are safe, and you can use them to flavor your food instead of salt.

DO NOT use salt substitutes because they contain potassium. People with chronic kidney disease also need to limit their potassium.

Online database: Sodium Content of Foods

POTASSIUM
Normal blood levels of potassium help keep your heart beating steadily. However, too much potassium can build up when the kidneys no longer function well. Dangerous heart rhythms may result.

Potassium is found in many food groups, including fruits and vegetables. Choosing the right item from each food group can help control your potassium levels.

When eating fruits:

•Choose peaches, grapes, pears, cherries, apples, berries, pineapple, plums, tangerines, and watermelon

•Limit or avoid oranges and orange juice, nectarines, Kiwis, raisins or other dried fruit, bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew, prunes, and nectarines

When eating vegetables:

•Choose broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, cucumber, eggplant, green and wax beans, lettuce, onion, peppers, watercress, zucchini, and yellow squash

•Limit or avoid asparagus, avocado, potatoes, tomatoes or tomato sauce, winter squash, pumpkin, avocado, and cooked spinach

Online database: Potassium Content of Foods

IRON

Patients with advanced kidney failure usually need extra iron.

Many foods contain extra iron (liver, beef, pork, chicken, lima and kidney beans, iron-fortified cereals).

Online database: Iron Content of Foods

Low-Potassium Fruits for Chronic Kidney Disease

List of fruits and fruit products lowest in potassium content. Potassium contents are in milligrams per 100 grams of food weight.



Potassium (mg)
Low-Potassium Fruits (100 g)

13
Pear nectar

17
Fruit juice bar, frozen, sweetened with low calorie sweetener, flavors other than orange

21
Cherries, maraschino

21
Grape juice, baby food

26
Cranberries, NS as to raw, cooked, or canned

26
Cranberries, cooked or canned

31
Papaya juice

31
Papaya nectar

33
Dutch apple dessert, baby food, strained

34
Cherry vanilla pudding, baby food, strained

37
Tropical fruit medley, baby food, strained

38
Soursop (Guanabana) nectar

40
Cranberries, dried

40
Blueberries, cooked or canned

40
Blueberries, cooked or canned, in heavy syrup

40
Peach juice, with sugar

40
Peach nectar

43
Cranberry-raspberry Sauce

45
Cherry cobbler, baby food, junior

46
Tutti-fruitti pudding, baby food

46
Tutti-fruitti pudding, baby food, strained

46
Blueberries, cooked or canned, unsweetened, water pack

47
Tutti-fruitti pudding, baby food, junior

50
Dutch apple dessert, baby food

50
Apples, baby food, toddler

51
Pears, baby food, toddler

52
Soup, sour cherry

53
Fruit juice bar, frozen, flavor other than orange

53
Sorbet, fruit, noncitrus flavor


Potassium (mg)
Low-Potassium Fruits (100 g)

53
Pear, cooked or canned, unsweetened, water pack

54
Blueberries, frozen, unsweetened

54
Blueberries, frozen, NS as to sweetened or unsweetened

54
Peach cobbler, baby food, strained

55
Guava nectar

55
Peach cobbler, baby food

56
Peach cobbler, baby food, junior

56
Mango nectar

60
Blueberries, frozen, sweetened

61
Applesauce, stewed apples, with sugar

61
Applesauce, stewed apples

62
Blueberry yogurt dessert, baby food, strained

62
Mixed fruit yogurt dessert, baby food, strained

65
Pear, cooked or canned, in heavy syrup

65
Pear, cooked or canned

66
Pear, cooked or canned, in light syrup

66
Pear, cooked or canned, drained solids

67
Dutch apple dessert, baby food, junior

67
Applesauce with other fruits

68
Bananas and pineapple, baby food, strained

68
Apple-raspberry, baby food, junior

70
Apple yogurt dessert, baby food, strained

70
Apple, cooked or canned, with syrup

71
Applesauce, baby food, strained

71
Banana apple dessert, baby food, strained

72
Apple-raspberry, baby food

73
Vinegar

73
Bananas and pineapple, baby food

74
Applesauce, baby food

74
Apple-raspberry, baby food, strained

75
Applesauce, stewed apples, sweetened with low calorie sweetener


Potassium (mg)
Low-Potassium Fruits (100 g)

75
Applesauce, stewed apples, unsweetened

75
Cranberry-orange relish, uncooked

75
Lime juice

75
Lime juice, canned or bottled

76
Cherry pie filling

77
Cranberry juice, unsweetened

77
Juneberry, raw

77
Applesauce, baby food, junior

77
Blueberries, raw

77
Huckleberries, raw

78
Orange, mandarin, canned or frozen

78
Orange, mandarin, canned or frozen, in light syrup

78
Bananas and pineapple, baby food, junior

78
Lemon pie filling

81
Pineapple dessert, baby food, strained

83
Peaches, baby food, toddler

83
Plums, baby food, junior

84
Plums, baby food

85
Peach, spiced

85
Cranberries, raw

85
Plums, baby food, strained

86
Rhubarb, cooked or canned, drained solids

86
Mixed fruit juice, not citrus, with added calcium, baby food

86
Strawberries, cooked or canned, in syrup

86
Strawberries, cooked or canned

87
Apple, pickled

87
Rhubarb, cooked or canned, in light syrup

88
Fruit cocktail, cooked or canned, in heavy syrup

89
Fruit cocktail, cooked or canned, in light syrup

89
Applesauce with bananas, baby food, strained

89
Lemon juice, frozen


Potassium (mg)
Low-Potassium Fruits (100 g)

90
Banana pudding, baby food, strained

90
Fruit cocktail, cooked or canned, drained solids

91
Apple, fried

91
Apple juice, baby food

91
Plum, cooked or canned

91
Plum, cooked or canned, in heavy syrup

91
Raspberries, cooked or canned, unsweetened, water pack

92
Peach, cooked or canned

92
Apple juice, with added calcium, baby food

92
Peach, cooked or canned, in heavy syrup

93
Plum, cooked or canned, drained solids

93
Apple, baked, with sugar

93
Plum, cooked or canned, in light syrup

93
Apple, baked, NS as to added sweetener

94
Peach, cooked or canned, drained solids

94
Raspberries, cooked or canned

94
Fruit dessert, baby food

94
Fruit dessert, baby food, strained

94
Fruit cocktail, cooked or canned, unsweetened, water pack

94
Raspberries, cooked or canned, in heavy syrup

95
Fruit dessert, baby food, junior

95
Apples and chicken, baby food, strained

95
Fruit cocktail, cooked or canned, juice pack

96
Rhubarb, cooked or canned, in heavy syrup

96
Rhubarb, frozen, with sugar

96
Rhubarb, cooked or canned

96
Apple, dried, cooked, with sugar

96
Rhubarb, frozen

96
Apples and pears, baby food, junior

96
Cantaloupe nectar

96
Pear, cooked or canned, juice pack

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