Health-Diet.us








Ulcerative Colitis Diet

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   Ulcerative Colitis Resources or Nutrition Software


Food NameProteinCarbFatFiber 
Milk, human1740
Milk3520
Milk, cow's, fluid, whole3530
Milk, cow's, fluid, whole, low-sodium3430
Milk, calcium fortified, cow's, fluid, whole3530
Milk, calcium fortified, cow's, fluid, 1% fat3510
Milk, calcium fortified, cow's, fluid, skim or nonfat3500
Milk, cow's, fluid, other than whole ("lowfat")3510
Milk, cow's, fluid, 2% fat3520
Milk, cow's, fluid, acidophilus, 1% fat3510
Milk, cow's, fluid, acidophilus, 2% fat3520
Milk, cow's, fluid, 1% fat3510
Milk, cow's, fluid, skim or nonfat, 0.5% or less butterfat3500
Milk, cow's, fluid, filled with vegetable oil3530
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What is ulcerative colitis?

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic, or long-lasting, disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the inner lining of the large intestine, which includes the colon and the rectum—the end part of the colon.

Ulcerative colitis is one of the two main forms of chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, called inflammatory bowel disease. The other form is called Crohn’s disease.

Normally, the large intestine absorbs water from stool and changes it from a liquid to a solid. In ulcerative colitis, the inflammation causes loss of the lining of the colon, leading to bleeding, production of pus, diarrhea, and abdominal discomfort.

What causes ulcerative colitis?

The cause of ulcerative colitis is unknown though theories exist. People with ulcerative colitis have abnormalities of the immune system, but whether these problems are a cause or a result of the disease is still unclear. The immune system protects people from infection by identifying and destroying bacteria, viruses, and other potentially harmful foreign substances. With ulcerative colitis, the body’s immune system is believed to react abnormally to bacteria in the digestive tract. Ulcerative colitis sometimes runs in families and research studies have shown that certain gene abnormalities are found more often in people with ulcerative colitis.

Ulcerative colitis is not caused by emotional distress, but the stress of living with ulcerative colitis may contribute to a worsening of symptoms. In addition, while sensitivity to certain foods or food products does not cause ulcerative colitis, it may trigger symptoms in some people.


Diet for Ulcerative Colitis

Dietary changes may help reduce ulcerative colitis symptoms. A recommended diet will depend on the person’s symptoms, medications, and reactions to food. General dietary tips that may alleviate symptoms include:

  • eating smaller meals more often
  • avoiding carbonated drinks
  • eating bland foods
  • avoiding high-fiber foods such as corn and nuts
For people with ulcerative colitis who do not absorb enough nutrients, vitamin and nutritional supplements may be recommended.

Ulcerative Colitis and Colon Cancer

People with ulcerative colitis have an increased risk of colon cancer when the entire colon is affected for a long period of time. For example, if only the lower colon and rectum are involved, the risk of cancer is no higher than that of a person without ulcerative colitis. But if the entire colon is involved, the risk of cancer is higher than the normal rate. The risk of colon cancer also rises after having ulcerative colitis for 8 to 10 years and continues to increase over time. Effective maintenance of remission by treatment of ulcerative colitis may reduce the risk of colon cancer. Surgical removal of the colon eliminates the risk of colon cancer.

How to use our food database to select foods for the ulcerative colitis diet

This food database provides the fat, carbohydrate and protein contents, as well as those of fiber of approximately 7,000 food items. A food's mineral and vitamin contents are displayed in charts to allow easy evaluation of its nutrition. You can use these vitamin and mineral charts to choose the most nutrient-dense foods and avoid foods with empty calories.
In addition, the calorie pie chart shows the contribution of fat, carb and protein to the food's total calorie. If you wish to choose low-fiber foods, you can sort foods by their fiber contents. Click on the Fiber column header to reverse the current sort order.

Usage Note

  • Fiber, fat, carbohydrate and protein values in table are in grams and calculated per 100g of food.
  • Click on column header to sort foods by name or by fiber, fat, carbohydrate or protein content.
  • Pie chart shows relative contributions to total calories from carbohydrate, protein and fat (and alcohol, if exists).
  • The mineral and vitamin charts show the relative contents of minerals and vitamins of each food. The higher the bubble, the higher mineral or vitamin content a food has relative to other foods. The larger the bubble, the greater the mineral or vitamin content relative to the Recommended Daily Allowances.

Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT) as Treatment for Ulcerative Colitis

information from the New York Times

At least a thousand strains of bacteria coexist in a healthy human bowel, and beneficial bacteria are involved in vitamin production, digestion and keeping “bad” bacteria in check. Thus, changes to the gut microbiome can precipitate disease. For instance, taking a powerful antibiotic wipes out both good and bad gut flora, which can lead to opportunistic bacteria taking over and causing infection.

Many people who suffer from clostridium difficile, a dangerous strain of bacteria that is becoming epidemic in hospitals and nursing homes, got it this way. The idea behind fecal transfers is that restoring colonies of healthy bacteria can either dilute or crowd out these harmful strains. And it seems to work: in January 2013, The New England Journal of Medicine reported that the first randomized clinical trial of F.M.T.’s for clostridium difficile had been halted because the treatment worked so well that it was unethical to withhold it from the control group.

Read a fascinating story about FMT at the New York Times: Why I Donated My Stool.


Fiber in Corn and Corn Products

Fiber is in grams per 100 grams of food weight.



Fiber in Corn Dishes Fiber

Corn, sweet, white, canned, whole kernel, no salt added, solids and liquids 0.7

Corn, sweet, yellow, canned, cream style, no salt added 1.2

Corn, sweet, yellow, canned, cream style, regular pack 1.2

Corn pudding, home prepared 1.2

Corn, sweet, white, canned, cream style, no salt added 1.2

Corn, sweet, white, canned, cream style, regular pack 1.2

Squash, winter, acorn, raw 1.5

Corn, sweet, yellow, canned, brine pack, regular pack, solids and liquids 1.7

Corn, sweet, yellow, canned, no salt added, solids and liquids 1.7

Corn, sweet, white, canned, whole kernel, regular pack, solids and liquids 1.7

Corn, sweet, yellow, canned, whole kernel, drained solids 1.9

Corn, sweet, yellow, raw 2.0

Corn, sweet, white, canned, vacuum pack, regular pack 2.0

Corn, sweet, white, canned, vacuum pack, no salt added 2.0

Corn, sweet, yellow, canned, vacuum pack, regular pack 2.0

Corn, sweet, white, canned, whole kernel, drained solids 2.0

Corn, sweet, yellow, canned, vacuum pack, no salt added 2.0

Corn, sweet, yellow, frozen, kernels cut off cob, unprepared 2.1

Corn, sweet, white, frozen, kernels on cob, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 2.1

Corn, sweet, white, frozen, kernels cut off cob, boiled, drained, with salt 2.4

Corn, sweet, yellow, frozen, kernels cut off cob, boiled, drained, without salt 2.4

Corn, sweet, yellow, cooked, boiled, drained, with salt 2.4

Corn, sweet, white, frozen, kernels cut off cob, unprepared 2.4

Corn, sweet, yellow, frozen, kernels, cut off cob, boiled, drained, with salt 2.4

Corn, sweet, yellow, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 2.4

Corn, sweet, white, frozen, kernels cut off cob, boiled, drained, without salt 2.4

Succotash, (corn and limas), canned, with whole kernel corn, solids and liquids 2.6

Squash, winter, acorn, cooked, boiled, mashed, with salt 2.6

Squash, winter, acorn, cooked, boiled, mashed, without salt 2.6


Fiber in Corn Dishes Fiber

Corn, yellow, whole kernel, frozen, microwaved 2.6

Corn, sweet, white, raw 2.7

Corn, sweet, white, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 2.7

Corn, sweet, white, cooked, boiled, drained, with salt 2.7

Corn, sweet, white, frozen, kernels on cob, cooked, boiled, drained, with salt 2.8

Corn, sweet, yellow, frozen, kernels on cob, unprepared 2.8

Corn, sweet, yellow, frozen, kernels on cob, cooked, boiled, drained, with salt 2.8

Corn, sweet, white, frozen, kernels on cob, unprepared 2.8

Corn, sweet, yellow, frozen, kernels on cob, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 2.8

Succotash, (corn and limas), canned, with cream style corn 3.0

Succotash, (corn and limas), raw 3.8

Succotash, (corn and limas), frozen, unprepared 4.0

Succotash, (corn and limas), frozen, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 4.1

Succotash, (corn and limas), frozen, cooked, boiled, drained, with salt 4.1

Squash, winter, acorn, cooked, baked, without salt 4.4

Squash, winter, acorn, cooked, baked, with salt 4.4

Succotash, (corn and limas), cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 4.5

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